Nigerians protest insecurity following ongoing kidnappings

Residents of the Nigerian city of Damishi took to the streets on Thursday to protest against the lack of security and the frequent kidnappings taking place in northern Kaduna state.

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Nigerians protest insecurity following kidnappings

Residents of the Nigerian city of Damishi took to the streets on Thursday to protest against the lack of security and the frequent kidnappings taking place in northern Kaduna state.

The small group of protesters blocked a street and chanted slogans demanding peace.

One of the demonstrators reported that at least 16 people had been kidnapped the previous day.

Their disappearance came two days after a group of gunmen stormed a local school and abducted 121 students.

The demonstrator called on the state’s governor to listen to worried residents like him and to act to bring peace and stability to Kaduna.

As the protesters staged their rally, parents of some of the kidnapped students gathered at the Bethel Baptist High School.

They’ve been coming there since Monday, the day their children were abducted, to pray and demand justice.

A group of gunmen stormed the school in the middle of the night, shooting sporadically as they kidnapped 121 students.

Two security guards lost their lives while battling the kidnappers, according to officials.

The father of one missing girl gathered at the school on Thursday called on the international community to help Nigeria’s children.

He urged them to call on the government to act because “we need our children back”.

Tragically, school abductions have become a common occurrence in northern Nigeria, where nearly 1,000 students have been kidnapped from schools since December.

The principal of the Prelude Comprehensive College in Kaduna city says the security crisis has had a massive impact on pupils attending his school.

Many parents are withholding their children from school out of fear something might happen to them, he said.

Missing class, however, means these children can’t sit national exams needed to enter universities or polytechnic institutions, according to the principal.

The crisis is also affecting teaching staff, some of whom have been let go because of budget shortfalls caused by a reduced number of students.

The spate of mass abductions from schools in Nigeria has grown significantly since 2014 when members of the jihadi rebels Boko Haram abducted 276 female students in Chibok in Borno State.

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